MaSSP Report: Mapping the Linkages between agriculture, food security and nutrition in Malawi

stunting map In spite of rapid small-holder led economic growth in Malawi over the past decade, almost half of all children under five years of age in Malawi still suffer from undernutrition. Although some of these children may be getting enough to eat in terms of total calories, few are consuming sufficient quantities of nutrient-rich foods—meat, fish, eggs, dairy, legumes, fruits and vegetables—on a regular basis. Why has agricultural growth not lead to improved diet and nutrition outcomes in the country? With nutrition typically framed as a health issue and the agriculture sector often equating maize production with food security, the role that agriculture plays in determining nutrition outcomes is often overlooked. This report describes the conceptual and empirical linkages between agriculture, food security and nutrition focusing on 4 main pathways: agriculture as a source of food, agriculture as a source of income, agriculture as a moderator of women’s time use and decision making power, and agriculture as a moderator of food markets. While not a comprehensive review of linkages, this report adds to the current state of knowledge on the ways in which agriculture can enhance diet and nutrition outcomes in Malawi.

Edited by Noora-Lisa Aberman, Janice Meerman and Todd Benson, 2015

Mapping the Linkages between agriculture, food security and nutrition in Malawi ~ Complete Report

Cover and Table of Contents

Chapter 1: Introduction to conceptual issues related to agriculture, food security, and nutrition

Chapter 2: Indicators for examining links between agriculture, food security, and nutrition

Chapter 3: Poverty, Food Prices, and Dietary Choices in Malawi

Chapter 4: Understanding the Pathways to Improved Diets from the Production of Nutritious and Marketable Commodities

Chapter 5: Food and Nutrition Security Implications of Crop Diversification in Malawi’s Farm Households

Chapter 6: Associations between irrigated farming and improved nutrition in Malawian farm households