Policy Note 27: Localized public investment and agricultural performance in Malawi: Synposis

The contribution of public investment to agricultural productivity is well recognized as a key determinant of agricultural growth. Malawi is one of the few countries in Africa that has surpassed the Comprehensive Africa Agriculture Development Program (CAADP) commitment of spending at least 10 percent of one's national budget on agriculture. Policy Note 27 focuses on how public >> Read more

Working Paper 17: Localized public investment and agricultural performance in Malawi: An econometric approach

Using panel data econometric techniques, this paper evaluates how public expenditure influences agricultural performance at the district level in Malawi by empirically estimating localized expenditure multipliers for the districts. The results of the analysis show that public expenditures in agriculture have generally been positive, with variable impacts on agricultural growth at the district level. The >> Read more

MoIT Dissemination Workshop on Export Bans and Minimum Farm Gate Prices

How can Malawi’s trade and export policies on agricultural products best support dual goals of food security and growth in the agriculture sector? Exploring this important topic, IFPRI presented research results at a “Dissemination Workshop on Export Bans and Minimum Farm Gate Prices Study” organized by the Ministry of Industry and Trade (MoIT), at the >> Read more

Discussion Paper 1549: A Farm Level Perspective of the Policy Challenges for Export Diversification in Malawi: Example of the Oilseeds and Maize Sectors

The primary goal of this study was to investigate the potential to expand oilseeds, specifically soybean, as an alternative commercial crop to tobacco among Malawian farmers. A principal motivation for undertaking the study at the microeconomic level is to determine, in a theoretically consistent fashion, the type of policy and economic environment under which farmers begin >> Read more

Working Paper 16: Discretionary maize policy interventions in Malawi: An impact analysis of export bans and minimum farm gate price

This study assesses the efficacy of maize export bans in improving food security in Malawi and of minimum farm gate prices in increasing the incomes of Malawian smallholder farmers. It relies primarily on price and trade flow analysis using secondary data. In brief, the analysis shows that neither tool has been particularly effective in recent >> Read more

Policy Note 25: Are Malawi’s maize and soya trade restrictions causing more harm than good? A summary of evidence and practical alternatives

Since the early 2000's, the government of Malawi has used trade restrictions, export bans in particular, to control trade flows for maize and soya, among other crops. This note explores how effective maize and soya export bans have been in achieving their stated goals. It also considers the unintended side effects of export bans, including >> Read more

Working Paper 15: Achieving food security and industrial development in Malawi: Are export restrictions the solution?

Restrictions on exports of staples or cash crops are frequently imposed in developing countries to promote food security or industrial development goals. By diverting production to the local market, these policies aim to reduce prices and increase the supply of food or intermediate inputs to the benefit of consumers or downstream industrial users. Although export >> Read more

Risks of unpredictable trade policy to Malawi’s economic growth

For two years, Malawi has promoted a policy environment conducive to the free trade of soya. This commitment is in line with its strategy to increase the scale of production of oilseed so that processors can count on a stable supply of raw inputs for value addition. Predictable policies help actors along the value chain—from >> Read more

Policy Note 21: Promoting Exports of Low-Aflatoxin Groundnut from Malawi

Malawi’s National Export Strategy is built on the premise that the promotion of exports and domestic value addition can contribute to economic growth and poverty reduction in a meaningful way. Groundnut shows particularly high potential because regional demand is strong and Malawi’s farmers are already quite familiar with improved methods for growing the crop. In spite of institutional weaknesses that make exporting time >> Read more

Policy Note 20: Challenges to soya export promotion: An institutional analysis of trade policy in Malawi

This policy note summarizes the results of the full study on the challenges of broadening Malawi's export base from largely tobacco-dominated to include other high potential commodities like soya.  This study hypothesizes that there are institutional barriers impeding consistent growth in soya exports and seek to identify the critical ones and undertakes an institutional analysis of the soya export >> Read more